Kitchen Sinks And Faucets

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Kitchen Sinks And Faucets

There are sometimes kitchen designers who do not “marry” the kitchen sinks and faucets in the way that they should. What I mean by that is that a Country French kitchen faucet made of brass should not be married to a stainless steel kitchen sink. Such mistakes can happen when someone who has no, or little, sense of style is the one to pick kitchen sinks and faucets.

 

Although stainless steel seems to still be attracting many buyers, there are just so many materials to pick from for both kitchen sinks and faucets. For instance the market is jam-packed with kitchen faucets that have been made from diverse materials. These include polished chrome steel, chrome, copper and brass and the ubiquitous stainless steel.

 

Stainless steel sinks are very plentiful, and most people seem to zero in on those and couple them with stainless steel faucets too. However, kitchen sinks now come in cast iron, and some of the more beautiful sinks are featuring etched tile-in on the apron front sinks that fit so well in the 19th century French kitchen styles. Thus those would go splendidly with steel, chrome, copper or brass, though I personally would lean toward brass myself.

One of the most beautiful kitchen sinks and faucets I have seen lately is a sink that was apparently inspired by 19th-century English dinnerware. The sink itself featured Victorian-style etched pheasant pictorials and it was suggested that it was a look flawlessly suited to an English country décor. The sink itself was yet another tile-in sink, and the gorgeous design was rendered in incredible sepia tones combining the colors of white and light brown biscuit; on the incredible earthen white sink, and that pictorial of the pheasant was show in a dark brown color. The unbelievable sink was paired with an antique faucet that also seemed to say Victorian style to me! The combination was breathtaking.

 

Another wonderful combination of kitchen sinks and faucets was a newer kind of sink that is made of cast iron and then covered with a heavy layer of enamel. But that’s not the wonderful part. What’s wonderful is that the sink comes in a myriad of colors and it is what’s called a trough sink. Thus, it is double its depth, which is 22” wide but has a depth of 11”. The water retaining part is 5”. It was paired with a beautiful and highly functional stainless faucet whose spout could be pulled out for ease in handling when washing dishes and such. Truly magnificent!

 

It should be obvious to you by now that we have come a long way from the tub in the kitchen of our forebears that had to be filled by hand from the well. We have mixed beauty with total functionality in ways that can only be called stunning.